Cancer-killing nanoparticles sneak through defenses camouflaged in tumor cells

Cancer has a few tricks up its sleeve to defend itself from the body’s immune system, but a new therapy designed by researchers at Penn State has now turned one of those tactics against it. The team camouflaged a cancer-killing drug using cells from the tumor itself, allowing them to sneak medicine past the tumor’s defenses like a nanoscale Trojan horse and deliver a killing blow from the inside…
Continue Reading Cancer-killing nanoparticles sneak through defenses camouflaged in tumor cells

Category: Medical

Tags:

Bloodstream

Cancer

Drug delivery

Nanoparticles

Pennsylvania State University

The Immune System

Tumors

Related Articles:

World’s first ciliary microrobots could change the way we take medicine

Nanogenerators could turn our veins into blood flow power plants

Magnetic nanoparticles designed to stop internal bleeding

3D-printed liver-like device can detoxify blood

Antioxidant found to wind back the clock on blood vessel function by up to 20 years

Clot-busting skin patch keeps the blood flowing with microneedles

The message will be closed after 20 s